The Wackiest Home in Every State

New Mexico: Taos Pueblo

For thousands of years, Taos Native Americans have lived in the Taos Pueblo—perhaps making it the most ancient structure in America. The buildings that are there now were most likely constructed between 1000 and 1450 C.E. To this day, visitors can still take a walk through this centuries-old establishment, which is still occupied by Taos Native Americans.

Image via realtor.com

New York: Bioscleave House

When you picture the Hamptons, you likely think of enormous mansions before you think of funky homes designed by avant-garde artists. The Bioscleave House, however, breaks the mold of the typical Hamptons house.

Built by artists Madeline Gins and Arakawa, the interior of the home is just as playful as the exterior, featuring a raised dining platform, earthen mounds in the flooring, and off-kilter windows—all painted a kaleidoscope of colors.

North Carolina: Biltmore Estate

George Vanderbilt, the grandson of famed industrialist Cornelius Vanderbilt, erected this 250-room French Renaissance chateau in Asheville, North Carolina, as a testament to his wealth and taste in 1889. Filled with a number of architectural treasures (like a two-story library), this estate continues to be one of the most prominent examples of the Gilded Age.

Though it’s still owned by the descendants of the Vanderbilts, tours are available to see this impressive mansion for yourself.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

North Dakota: Coghlan Castle

The only standing castle in the state of North Dakota, the Coghlan Castle was built using stone at a time during the early 20th-century when nearly every other building was made of sod. Located in a remote part of the state, the castle had been left to rot since the Coghlan family left it in the 1940s.

This hidden gem remained largely unknown until it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2008. A decade later, it’s still in the process of being renovated.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Ohio: The Mushroom House

Located in Cincinnati, Ohio, the Mushroom House appears as though it has been transported to the landscape straight from a fairytale. Architect Terry Brown created this interesting space, complete with a cone-shaped addition and several architectural oddities that make it the most interesting residence in the state.

Related Articles

Decorations

Garden

House

Renovate

Style

Tips